crickey. THIS is why you should be watching Studio 60

studio60So I’m watching tonight’s episode of Studio 60 and may I say: fantastic. From every angle. Funny and moving, politically sharp, heart stopping romantic banter. Three of the primary characters in this promo shot: the producer Danny Trip (Bradley Whitford), the head writer Matt Albie (Matthew Perry), and Jordan McDeere, the newly appointed network president of the National Broadcast System, a maverick at heart, single, and pregnant (Amanda Peet).

Thus far Aaron Sorkin has been writing all the episodes (sometimes with a co-writer). Sorkin is the guy who wrote the best episodes of West Wing and Sports Night. Studio 60 makes it evident that he has not lost his touch. It probably also helps that Studio 60 is primarily about the writing and producing of a television program and one of the main characters is apparently based in part on himself.

Sorkin is the king of banter and he’s not too shabby at monologue, either. From tonight’s episode (he character Danny finally speaks his mind to Jordan):

I’ve been married twice before and I’m a recovering cocaine addict, and I know that’s no woman’s dream of a man or a father. Nonetheless I believe I’m falling in love with you. If you want to run I understand, but you better get a good head start. Because I’m coming for you, Jordan.

This is definitely a keeper of a television show. Let’s hope Sorkin sticks with it.

6 Replies to “crickey. THIS is why you should be watching Studio 60”

  1. “Nonetheless I believe I’m falling in love with you. If you want to run I understand, but you better get a good head start. Because I’m coming for you, Jordan.”

    I haven’t watched the show, and I realize this is taken out of context, but to me it sounds creepy — quasi-stalking behavior.

    It’s Ok if You Are a Male. The guy can admit to a relationship trail and an addiction problem and still say something like that, and be taken seriously as a character.

    It’s a familiar meme in romance: no matter what lengths the man goes to to win the lady, it’s admirable. “No” is not an option.

    If the speaker were female, though, I think she’d be treated as a bunny boiler.

  2. You’re right. Out of context and without the body language, this could sound threatening. But the whole thing hinges on his respect for her, and how well they have worked together in both professional and personal crises. Also, he’s standing at arm’s length when he delivers the speech.

    You’re also right about the double standard. It would take a particularly skilled writer and/or actor to pull this off if the gender roles were reversed.

    I’ll have to see if I can manage it myself.

  3. Sorkin could write a woman to say that and make it work. It was, as delivered, one of the finest lines delivered in modern television history. Watch the episode.

  4. “I’ll have to see if I can manage it myself.”

    I’m sure you could. Which also raises the question, will Sorkin treat it in the usual way (not least because it’s got the constraints of a prime time TV show), or will he choose an unconventional development?

    Would be cool if he could pull off the latter.

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